Better Days Will Come

Mother and daughter relationships are very strong. Grace is desperate to keep her family together but circumstances work against her. At the beginning of the book she discovers that, for some reason, her daughter is on the train to London and when she gets there, she’ll have nowhere to stay…

“This book was such a warm comforting read but with plenty of twists and turns to be a great page turner. You get so involved with the main characters that you laugh and cry with them. Cant wait for the next Pam Weaver book. Brilliant.” QY

 “Great book – takes you through the highs & lows of mothers & daughters – and how love works out in the end.”  WI

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Excerpt from Better Days Will Come
Manny Hart stood at the entrance to the station platform with his hand out. ‘Tickets please.’ If he was surprised by the state of her, he said nothing.
‘I’ve got to get to the other side before the train leaves,’ Grace blurted out.
Mother and daughter relationships are very strong. Grace is desperate to keep her family together but circumstances work against her. At the beginning of the book she discovers that, for some reason, her daughter is on the train to London and when she gets there, she’ll have nowhere to stay…

He glanced over his shoulder towards a group of men, all in smart suits, walking along the platform. ‘Then you’ll need a platform ticket.’ Manny seemed uncomfortable.
Grace’s heart sank. Her purse was sitting on the dresser in the kitchen. ‘I’ll pay you next time I see you.’
But Manny was in no mood to be placated. ‘You need a ticket,’ he said stubbornly. The men hovered by the entrance while on the other side of the rack, the train shuddered and the steam hissed.‘You don’t understand,’ Grace cried. ‘I’ve simply got to…’ Her hands were searching her empty pockets and she was beginning to panic. She was so angry and frustrated she could have hit him. She looked around wildly and saw a woman who lived just up the road from her. ‘Excuse me, Peggy. Could you lend me a penny for a platform ticket, only I must catch someone on the train before it goes.’
‘Of course, dear. Hang on a minute, I’m sure I’ve got a penny in here somewhere.’ Peggy Jones opened her bag, found her purse and handed Grace a penny. As it appeared in her hand, Grace almost snatched it and ran to the platform ticket machine, calling, ‘Thank you, thank you’ over her shoulder. To add to her frustration, the machine was reluctant to yield and she had to thump it a couple of times before the ticket appeared.
The passengers who were getting off at Worthing were already starting to head towards the barrier as she thrust the ticket at Manny Hart. He clipped it and went to hand it back but Grace was already at the top of the stairs leading to the underpass which came up on the other side and platform two. Now she was hampered by the steady flow of people coming in the opposite direction.
‘Close all the doors.’
The porter’s cry echoed down the stairs and into the underpass. The train shuddered again and just as she reached the stairwell leading up she heard the powerful shunt of steam and smoke which heralded its departure. She was only halfway up the stairs leading to platform two when the guard blew his whistle and the lumbering giant was on the move. How she got to the top of the stairs, she never knew but as soon as she emerged onto the platform she knew it was hopeless. Through the smoke and steam, the last two carriages were all that was left. The train was gone.